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CREATIVE WRITING WORKSHOP 2014 (Satis Shroff) 

 

WELCOME to Creative Writing at the Freiburger Writing Center (Schreibzentrum PH-Freiburg). Satis Shroff is a published writer, and if you’re interested in Creative Writing he will be guiding you in your writings. We can’t offer you credit-points for your writing but if you write for fun and want to take your writing forward then just come along and give it a try. Satis Shroff is an experienced lecturer, poet and writer and the published author of five books. You can read his books on http://www.Lulu.com/spotlight/satisle.

 

 Satis Shroff describes himself as a mediator between western and eastern cultures and sees his future as a writer and poet. Since literature is one of the most important means of cross-cultural learning, he is dedicated to promoting and creating awareness for Creative Writing and transcultural togetherness in his writings, and in preserving an attitude of Miteinander in this world. He lectures in Basle (Switzerland) and in Germany at the Academy for Medical Professions (University Klinikum Freiburg) and the VHS-Freiburg and VHS-Dreisamtal. He has worked as a Lehrbeauftragter for Creative Writing and Scientific English at the Uni Freiburg, and now at the PH.

 

Die Termine sind am: Montag, 12. Mai 2014 (von 18 Uhr bis 21 Uhr), Montag, 2. Juni, 2014 (18.00 bis 21 Uhr) und Montag, 7. Juli 7, 2014 (18.00 bis 21 Uhr).  

 

Creative Writing Workshop (Englisch): Öffnungszeiten: Mo 12-16, Di 14-16, Do 10-14 Uhr , (Telefon: 0761-682-191)  

 

Verbindliche Anmeldung unter: info@schreibzentrum-freiburg.de Gerd Bräuer PhD, braeuer@ph-freiburg.de Satis Shroff: satisle@myway.com What others have said about the author: Satis Shroff writes with intelligence, wit and grace. (Bruce Dobler, Associate Professor in Creative Writing MFA, University of Iowa). 

 

 ‘The manner in which Satis Shroff writes takes the reader right along with him. Extremely vivid and just enough and the irony of the music. Beautiful prosaic thought and astounding writing.  ‘Your muscles flex, the nerves flatter, the heart gallops, As you feel how puny you are, Among all those incessant and powerful waves.’

 “Satis Shroff’s writing is refined – pure undistilled.” (Susan Marie,Journalist & Writer, http://www.Gather.com)

 

  “I was extremely delighted with Satis Shroff’s work. Many people write poetry for years and never obtain the level of artistry that is present in his work. He is an elite poet with an undying passion for poetry.” Nigel Hillary, Publisher, Poetry Division – Noble House U.K.

 

 Copyright © 2014, Satis Shroff (Freiburg). You may republish this article online provided you keep the byline, the authors’ note, and the active hyperlinks. ———————————————————————————————————– COMMUNICATION 

 Module: Creative Writing: Poems, Short-stories, Microstories Lecturer: Satish Shroff, B.Sc. (Zoology, Botany), Dipl. Social Sciences, Creative Writing Uni Freiburg and Manchester (UK), writer, poet, journalist and artist. Max. students: 

 

20 ECTS Points: none

 

 Ziel: The aim of this course is to develop and improve language creativity in English, learn successful writing habits, work on one’s creative impulse, learn basic writing techniques, and develop an idea factory, improve writing skills and try different genres. Whether it’s poetry, short-stories, microstories, fiction or non-fiction, you have to learn the precise use of language and that’s where Creative Writing comes in. If you’ve always wanted to write an anthology or a book, then join us in an atmosphere of mutual respect, tolerance, cooperation and fun in writing. Creative Writing leads to the critical appreciation of literary works and through it you learn to be a critical writer and a demanding reader. It offers a challenge to the mythology of a writer as a ‘genius.’ The idea of a Creative Writing course, seminar or workshop is nothing new, for writers and poets have in the past such as Lord Byron and Mary Shelley and her husband PB Shelley and Goethe and Schiller have always worked together. It was Ezra Pound who advised TS Eliot to rewrite The Waste Land. I like George Bernard Shaw’s advice: ‘If you do not write for publication, there is little point to writing at all.’  

 

Public Reading: At the end of the course you will get the opportunity to have your submissions (poems, microstories, short-stories printed in an anthology in the internet, if and when, you give your consent. I think it’s fun to share your creative works. There will also be a public reading with Annette Pehnt’s students (German Literature) who will be doing Kreatives Schreiben in a parallel course in German.  

 

Inhalt: Every student has to write when he or she studies at the university. In this course we do the basics of writing techniques which can be used for poetry, fiction, non-fiction and short-story and microstory writing. 1 . Microstories (flash fiction, prose poems) 2. A Cross-pollination of Forms (Imagery, Inspiration, Poetry) 3. The Interview 2 4. How to gather stories: Notebooks, Journals, Mining Memory 5. Variety in Your Writing 6. Fiction Techniques in Non-fiction Writing 7. Dialogue and Plot 8. Writing the Short Story  

 

Zu erbringende Leistungen: Active participation throughout the course, writing classwork and homework submissions,writing exercises during the extended weekend courses,The writing workshop at the PH-Schreibzentrum is open for non-PH people as well. A one-time fee of 10 euros has to be paid for the entire series of workshops.  

 

Bemerkungen: Knowledge of English literature welcome but not a necessity. Students from all PH faculties and non-PH faculties (University students, Fachhochschule,FH) and scribblers from all walks of life are welcome. Curious? Just drop in at the Schreibzentrum. Die Angebote des Schreibzentrums sind für die Studierenden der PH Freiburg kostenfrei. Alle anderen Nutzer/innen der Creative Writing Workshop bezahlen 10. Die Bezahlung erfolgt bar und gegen Quittung im Schreibzentrum.

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Freiburger Creative Writing Workshop mit Satish Shroff 2014

 

Satis Shroff leitet den Freiburger englischen Creative Writing Workshop in das Schreibzentrum der PH-Freiburg for PH-Studentinnen und nicht-PH Leute die Interesse haben Mikrogeschichten, Kurzgeschichten, Stream-of-Consciousness zu schreiben, wie einst James Joyce und Virginia Woolf, Gedichte usw. Die zu erbringende Leistungen sind: aktive Partizipation während der Workshop, Klassenübungen und Schreibhausaufgaben. Alle studentische und Leute die Lust am Schreiben haben sind Willkommen. Der Workshop findet in der PH-Schreibzentrum statt. Ein einmaliges Gebühr von 10 Euro wird von Ihnen verlangt für das ganze Workshop.

Erkenntnis von englische Literatur ist Willkommen aber nicht erzwingend. Studenten von alle PH Fakultäten und Nicht-PH Leute sind Willkommen.

Die Termine sind am:

Montag, 2. Juni, 2014 (18.00 bis 21 Uhr) und

Montag, 7. Juli , 2014 (18.00 bis 21 Uhr).

 

Public Reading: At the end of the semester there will be a public reading with Satis Shroff and Annette Pehnt’s students of Creative Writing in English and German respectively. The date for the public reading will be announced in due time.

 

 

Satis Shroff lebt in Freiburg (poems, fiction, non-fiction). Er hat Zoologie und Botanik in Nepal (Tribhuvan University), Sozialarbeit (FH) und Medizin (Uni) in Freiburg studiert. Creative Writing hat er in Freiburg unter Professor Bruce Dobler (Uni Freiburg) und Manchester (UK) gelernt. Da Literatur eine der wichtigsten Wege ist, um die Kulturen kennenzulernen, hat er sein Leben dem Kreatives Schreiben gewidmet. Er arbeitete früher als Dozent in Basel (Schweiz) und jetzt in Freiburg an der Akademie für medizinische Berufe (Uniklinik Freiburg) und VHS-Freiburg und VHS-Dreisamtal. Er hat auch an der Freiburger Uni Creative Writing gelehrt. Ihm wurde der DAAD-Preis verliehen und andere Preise für sein Soziales Engagement.

 

Creative Writing Workshop (Englisch):

Öffnungszeiten: Mo 12-16, Di 14-16, Do 10-14 Uhr , (Telefon: 0761-682-191)

Verbindliche Anmeldung unter:

info@schreibzentrum-freiburg.de

Gerd Bräuer PhD, braeuer@ph-freiburg.de

Satis Shroff: satisle@myway.com

 

 

 

 

 

 

CREATIVE WRITING WORKSHOP 2014

(Satis Shroff)

 

WELCOME to Creative Writing at the Freiburger Writing Center (Schreibzentrum PH-Freiburg). Satis Shroff is a published writer, and if you’re interested in Creative Writing he will be guiding you in your writings. We can’t offer you credit-points for your writing but if you write for fun and want to take your writing forward then just come along and give it a try.

 

Satis Shroff is an experienced lecturer, poet and writer and the published author of five books. You can read his books on http://www.Lulu.com/spotlight/satisle.

 

Satis Shroff describes himself as a mediator between western and eastern cultures and sees his future as a writer and poet. Since literature is one of the most important means of cross-cultural learning, he is dedicated to promoting and creating awareness for Creative Writing and transcultural togetherness in his writings, and in preserving an attitude of Miteinander in this world. He lectures in Basle (Switzerland) and in Germany at the Academy for Medical Professions (University Klinikum Freiburg) and the VHS-Freiburg and VHS-Dreisamtal. He has worked as a Lehrbeauftragter for Creative Writing and Scientific English at the Uni Freiburg, and now at the University of Education (PH-Freiburg).

 

Die Termine sind am:

Montag, 12. Mai 2014 (von 18 Uhr bis 21 Uhr),

Montag, 2. Juni, 2014 (18.00 bis 21 Uhr) und

Montag, 7. Juli 7, 2014 (18.00 bis 21 Uhr).

 

Creative Writing Workshop (Englisch):

Öffnungszeiten: Mo 12-16, Di 14-16, Do 10-14 Uhr , (Telefon: 0761-682-191)

Verbindliche Anmeldung unter:

info@schreibzentrum-freiburg.de

Gerd Bräuer PhD, braeuer@ph-freiburg.de

Satis Shroff: satisle@myway.com

 

What others have said about the author:

Satis Shroff writes with intelligence, wit and grace. (Bruce Dobler, Associate Professor in Creative Writing MFA, University of Iowa).

‘The manner in which Satis Shroff writes takes the reader right along with him. Extremely vivid and just enough and the irony of the music. Beautiful prosaic thought and astounding writing. 
‘Your muscles flex, the nerves flatter, the heart gallops,
As you feel how puny you are,
Among all those incessant and powerful waves.’

Satis Shroff’s writing is refined – pure undistilled.” (Susan Marie,Journalist & Writer, http://www.Gather.com)

I was extremely delighted with Satis Shroff’s work. Many people write poetry for years and never obtain the level of artistry that is present in his work. He is an elite poet with an undying passion for poetry.” Nigel Hillary, Publisher, Poetry Division – Noble House U.K.

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Savvy a Letter From Nepal in Nepali (devnagari) script?

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From my dear Dada & Deviji (Patan Dhoka)..

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(Satis Shrof with member of the Freiburger Nepalese Association at a Nepalese dance performance)

‘Nepali stands at the end of a long string of dialects stretching along the foothills of the Himalayas, its nearest neighbour being Kumaoni; but, like the others, it has been open to the influence of the languages of the Tarai and the Plains of the South. In it too we see the development of a purely local dialect, of the district of Gorkha, into the language of administration for a whole kingdom…Nepali is a sturdy, vigorous tongue, capable of poetry–you have your poets–and of strong, simple, nervous prose. Hindi is one language, Nepali is another. Do not let your lovely language become the pale reflection of a Sanskritised Hindi.’ (Courtesy: Sir Ralph L.Turner, concluding an address delivered at the British Embassy, Kathmandu, on the occasion of the coronation of His majesty King Mahendra Bir Bikram Shah Deva, 1955).

Well it’s 2014 now and the nation has seen the emergence of the maoists in a decade long Himalayan civil-war in which a great many Nepalese were injured or died.

The Shah family have been ousted from the Narayanhiti Palace, which has been turned into a national museum, and this once forbidden kingdom is now a federal republic.

What remains are the old wounds and trauma of a nation that’ll take time to heal. To this end I’d like to wish my former countrymen and women all the best. The best thing you can do for your children is to give them a good education, and not a khukri. This was denied to generations of Gurkhas by the former British governments because they practiced a policy of non-inclusion in the daily life of Britain and treated them as merely mercenaries that you could hire-and-fire at will. I hope that in the future the Gurkhas and their families will be integrated in the British society in police and security forces, and also in civilian life, like the other members of the Commonwealth, which were Britain’s former colonies.

Nepal had a so-called special relationsship and was subtely excluded from the Commonwealth. Some ‘special relationship’ indeed, the consequence of which had to be shared by generations of Nepalese children who lost their Dads who died under the Union Jack and for the glory of England.

When an injured soldier wanted medical treatment due to injuries that occured while fighting for England’s glory they were denied medical treatment by the MoD and NHS in England. No, Britain doesn’t want Gurkhas with gerontological problems either. What a cheap solution for cheap fighting men from the Himalayas. It’s only in recent times that the Gurkhas have started going to court and winning legal battles against the formidable, heartless, bureaucratic MoD based in London. The different government and the Prime Ministers as well as the Monarchs and, of course, MoD have been giving each other the blame for the misery of the Gurkhas instead of bringing out a plan for the welfare of the Gurkhas and their families. Instead of allowing the Gurkha children and the same right as the political regugees and asylum seekers in the United Kingdom, the powers that be have given the Gurkhas a no-benefit status in its civilian life. The Gurkhas were brought to the Gurkha brigades just to fight England’s foes outside the country as cheap labourers-at-arms, whom you could hire and fire at the will of the British officers. If there was a small quarrel or revolt at the wrong-doing of the officers, it was the Gurkhas who were sent to their home country. Protests were not heard of. A Gurkha was expected to fight and the thinking was supposed to be the right of the British officers. The olde colonial set-up. Even officers who should have opened their mouths didn’t comply as they feared promotion in their ranks; they were scared of being court marshalled. And yet these very officers played polo, went to the officer’s clubs, drank gin, expensive scotch and talked about their ‘brave, courageous, fearless, blood curdling Gurkhas.’ They just didn’t seem to realise that even Gurkhas are humans who had wishes and desires to mortals, who had families and depandants in the craggy hills of their mountainous country.  

I heard a Scottish lady who’s father was a Gurkha officer say, “Oh, the Gurkhas shouldn’t protest. If they do that they’ll be sent back to Nepal.” This is the standard punishment meted out to loyal friends and “special relationships.” I’ve never witnessed such hypocracy anywhere in my life. Dankeschön.  

So much for the still colonial master-servant relationship between the Brits and their Johnny Gurkhas.

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10.Mai 2014

Schwarzwald Diary (Satis Shroff) 

 

 I was woken up by the sun’s rays that shone into my room. I went to the traditional stony terrace and looked towards the Black Forest mountains in the direction of Kirchzarten and was rewarded by the sight of the rising sun. After a Schwarzwälder breakfast and a quick scanning of the zeitungen I decided to go to Cafe Mozart to a reading by a Freiburger poetess named Lilo Külp, which I’d been postponing all these years.  (The Freiburger poetess Lilo Külp reading in Cafe Mozart) The cafe is run by family Rückert and it’s near the Siegesdenkmal, a cafe that reminded my of my journey to Salzburg, where Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart was born. The poetess was accompanied musicaly by Claudia Thyme, who played the sax and conjured up melodies from 1001 Nights because that was also a part of the reading. The story in verse was about Lousianna, a poetess with a beautiful voice. Her father goes on a long journey and gives her a good piece of advice to use her resources. She walks up to a temple. Opens the door, enters it, goes to the altar and starts telling her story. – Suddenly a voice asks her rudely, “What are you doing here?” It is the temple priest. Go away, this is not the place for telling such tales.” She’s sad and leaves the temple. A small sparrow chirps and says, “Tell your story to the people in the streets.” She follows this advice. The people listened, coins began to roll in and she had a lot of stuff for tales. She meets a carpet seller in the busy street, who uses his entire charm and cunningness to sell his wares and creates a furore every time. It was a wonderful rendering from a frail Lilo Külp but when she talks her eyes light up and everything she says is interesting. She knows how to capture her audience. Frau Külf read from her book of poems with the title ‘Even the Half-Moon is Lovely.’ (Freiburg’s midwives demonstrating low-pay and bad job perspectives at the Kaiser Joseph Strasse, Bertold’s Fountain in downtown Freiburg). They were supported by a good many parents, which reminded me a lecture I’d given on Obstetrics which dealt with pregnancy and labor symptoms, and whether a water-birth is good or a birth in a hospital, the advantages and disadvantages of both.  MITEINANDER (Togetherness): MGV-Kappel “Liederkranz,” Musikverein-Freiburg-Kappel and Trachtenverein St. Ulrich The Spring Concert of the Musikverein-Kappel organised a good programme and even invited a guest brass band called the Trachten-Kapelle St. Ulrich conducted by Hans Breika, an athletic, tall man. They’d brought their own moderator along: Monika Steiert. The Musikverein Freiburg-Kappel was conducted by Bernhard Winter, a jolly Bavarian, who in the course of the evening told me over a glass of sekt that he’d bought a piece of land in the vicinity of Lake Ontario and wanted to spend the winter of his life in Canada. What a pleasant thought. He confided that he does have German croonies there, and he goes often to the USA and Canada. The moderation of the Kappler band was to be done of Karin Peter but she could’d and so Klaus Gülker , a South-West Radio man with the gift of the German gab, had volunteered to take over the moderation, which he did with elan, spiced with poetry and a touch of humour. The first piece was John William’s ‘Fanfare’ and there was a lot of fanfare in it. The good thing about a brass band is that it’s performed with oomph. The next song was ‘I Remember Clifford’ composed by Benny Golson, a story of an unlucky trumpet player; a beautiful melody with drums, trumpet played by the Kappler musician Stefan Nerz, who’s name Gülker translated literally to Mink. You could have danced a good fox trot to this melody, but since it was a concert, nobody did. Then came the ‘Headliner’ composed by Dennis Armitage, a quick-step tact and melody; rather catchy tune. This was followed by James barnes’ ‘Danza Sinfonica’ with whom the cunductor Bernard Winter had telephone for hours. He said he’d drunk more than a beer with Dennis Armitage in Chicago. The great-great-great grandfather of James Barnes was also mentioned. The orchestra produced a big sound, making maximal use of brass and big drums, tamborine; the sound emulated a paso doble mingled with Arabian Nights and Spanish castanettes. The flute, clarinet and sax melodies were charming and transported the audience to another world. A difficult piece masterly performed and conducted by the Musikverein-Kappel conducted by Bernd Winter. The last number was ‘The Stars and Stripes Forever’ composed by John Philip Sousa. It might be mentioned that a term was coined during those early days ‘the sousaphone,’ an instrument which sounds like a bomb in an orchestra. Don’t we love American composers out here in Europe, especially Germany? Yes, we do. Five musicians of the Musikverein-Kappel who’d been playing still in the verein were honoured, among others Dominik and Isabelle Steiert. Joachim Maurer came after attending the soccer match in Kenzingen (from the Oberbadische verband) and thanked Albert Dold for his dedicated service for 5o years with the verein in Kappel. He’d joined the Musikverein-Kappel in 1968 at the age of 12 and received the golden Ehren-needle. After the intermission the Trachtenkapelle St. Ulrich conducted by Hans Breika played the Procession of Nobles (Einzug der Edelleute)composed by Nicholas Rimsky Korsakov which was with a lot of oomph and clarion calls. The men were dressed in white shirts, black trousers and scarlet waistcoats with golden buttons, which suited the brass instruments they were playing: horns, trumpets, trombones and the like. ‘Second Suite for Band’ composed by Alfred Reed was followed by ‘The Wizard of Oz’ which was introduced as the American answer to the German fairy tales by the Grimm brothers, and which was made popular by Judy Garland. ‘Somewhere over the Rainbow’was one of the world hits. The Cordillerasde los Andes’ composed by Klees Vlak took the audience to the far off Andes mountains of South America with such works as: Cotopaxi, Illmani and Coro puna. The musical presentation by the traditional Trachtenkapelle St. Ulrich (located near the town of Au)in their colourful costumes came up with Latin American melodies which began slowly, was frivolous with rumba-elements and evoked fiery Latin feelings culimnating in samba rhythms. Gallilero composed by Thomas Doss was played towards the end depicting a time when South America was conquered by the Spanish conquistadors. On the whole the compositions were a good melange of North and South American melodies and it was an enjoyable evening.

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What Moves the Schauinsländer Berggeister in Kappel? (Satis Shroff)

<b>Höllenzunft News:</b> The Fifth Season has arrive and it’s time for merry-making in the Vale of Dreisam. The knaves, or Narren as we call them,are everywhere. have overtaken the village and town councils and built new governments, and passed new laws (Narrengesetz). The mayor are obliged to turn over their offices to the masked knaves, witches and all sorts of motley coloured fighures and ghouls that make their way to government seats in a spirit of merriment and joy, a state of emergency has been declared. If you can’t fight this motley crowd, why, then join ’em. That’s your only way out if you want to stay in your village, town or city. Your only other option is to make for the open spaces or the mountains like the Venetians do when it’s carvevaltime in the city of lagoons, when the costumed visitors go looney.I, on my part, am heading for the North Sea Isle of Sylt to enjoy the fresh, salty air and the cold gusts from the sea. I’m on a wellness trip, and say bye-bye to my cyber-friends for a few weeks ( till the fasnet madness is over,eh?).

After all, every knave has his or her rights. Not only have the keys handed over to the masked and motley-clad figures but also the cash-boxes. The freedom of the knaves isn’t allowed to be ill-spent with work. The pedestrian traffic is obliged to take the form of costumed procesions. Everything will be regulated in a case-to-case manner; what remains unchanged is the law concerning youth (Jugendgesetz). Enjoy the fifth season or ‘närrische times’ as we call it, till Ash Wednesday. This order has to be followed without a second thought. Every person who is nabbed for not following these rules, will have to forsake of his or her närrischen honorary rights.

Proclaimed in Kirchzarten on ‘schmutzige ‘ (dirty) Thursday, 27. February anno Domini 2014.

Signed by the clique council of Höllenzunft Kirchzarten.

Fasnet or Fastnacht (the night of fasting) is carnevaltime in Germany, Austria and Switzerland, a time to wear new costumes, throw confetti at passersby and eat sweet ‘leckerlis’ from the many German and Swiss bakeries such as fasnet’s cute, small cakes, Berliners with marmalade fillings and fried sweet-meat, ‘Mutzen’, Nautzen or Mäuschen (little mice, not real ones).

During the procession on Rose Monday you get to see the cheerful side of the Alpine and Teutonic people along the Rhine, the Black Forest, the Baar, the Ortenau and the Wiesen Valley, where the Hansele, witches, demons, vampires, mountain spirits, animals-mask wearers greet you. In Schramberg (Schwarzwald) you even get a Brezel-blessing if you sing the song of the clique he or she belongs to.

In Kappel it’s the tradition among the Schauinsländerberggeister to recite a prosepoem about the local gossip that’s making the rounds in the Stammtisch of the taverns. Each prosepoem has a moral at the end. Here are a few:

A man in Kappel, we hear it everywhere, tries to keep fit by jogging around our fair village. Sometimes he walks like a pedestrian, our villahe mayor. He moves such a lot of things at our place, goes to meetings here and there, and when it comes to saving money, he outdoes Uncle Ebenizer.However, it didn’t work once, on Christmas it was, as every child knows. He used to play music to the tune of Herrn Preis, the men’s choir sings to it, a concert and the hall is full. The village mayor also attends it, that’s very clever but the route was too far. He thinks it’s better to do it by car from Hagematten. Ah, it’s difficult to park your car, for the place is full. ‘I’ll park it in ‘Zwei Linden,’a tavern with two trees. But does it make any sense, it’s just a few metres to the place. People have often noticed he doesn’t walk or run as expected and takes his car, even though his destinations aren’t afar. It would have been good for his figure and belly, the gain in time, instead of jogging.

The moral of this story: a walk doesn’t damage your health. <i>(A Cautious Citizen)

</i>
<b>Tree in a House-On-Wheels</b>

Our mater-of-ceremonies has no problem,
His caravan can remain at the Nussi all the while,
For he works there the whole time.
But misfortune is on its way already,
On a windy, stormy day.
The tree made a hole suddenly,
As it fell on the caravan near the foyer.
The door caved in, the kitchen hung,
There was no place to cook a dish.
He can make it clear,
And wrings with words.
Without scorn and without rage,
He told his tale.
The moral at the end of the song?
He had to bring his caravan now to Oberried.

* * *

 

<b>The First Fire Brigade Excursion</b>

The firebrigade undertakes an excursion, that’s clear,
To Hamburg by train this early year.
In the journey there was a problem:
Two men wanted to smoke very badly.
But in the train there was no smoking compartment,
No wonder they muttered and complained.
Great minds think alike: they had an idea.
And went together to the loo.
The conductor caught them in flagranti,
And wanted to throw ’em out at full speed.

* * *

<b>Kindergarten Reconstruction</b>

I wanted to bring my small child
In January to the Kindergarten.
There were enough places, I was told.
But when I arrived it was a lie.
It wasn’t finished yet.
You can’t get in so fast.
They blame each other,
And the parents have no peace at home.
The crane stands still,
And the workers sit around,
I hope it doesn’t go on for long.

* * *

 

<b>The Hausmättle is not harvested</b>

Jokes aside,
In Kappel it’s easy,
As a farmer to get rid of your own grass.
Instead of leaving it,
To make hay as the sun shines,
They throw grass into the green container.
It’s loaded into the front-loading tractor.
When the green container’s full,
Don’t worry about it.
You can always get rid of your green cuttings
At the mountain farmer’s meadow.

 

<b>Baking Spring-Forms</b>

The hard-working Kappeler housewife
Wanted to bake a fine cake,
It can only be the Christmas-tree baron’s daughter,
She thought muffins can be baked speedily.
Ha! It might be fun,
And the dough was made,
Exactly after a recipe.
She used a modern spring-form,
Made of silikon.
With it things ‘ll be better,
And a good result is the reward.
The form was filled fast,
Put into the over at 200 degrees.
After an hour it was brown above
And thoroughly baked.
Oh, the creation has to be tasted,
There’s no doubt about it,
But it crunched between the teeth,
As though it was sand.
She noticed that something was wrong
With the spring-form.
That’s the way it is,
When the daughter uses her sandform.

* * *

<b>Ominous Dimdig Valley</b>

The Kappeler went to ski in Switzerland
Since years its been cool.
A lot of things happened again,
What the Kappeler actually do.

The hunter had cursed,
For he was looking for his green crogs.
He didn’t find it.
They were at home under his bed.

Dela wanted to go to the ski slope,
But her handbag wasn’t there.

The way we know Ella,
She went down in the snow,
Like a wild hen.
They couldn’t find her for a long time.
Riesterer had taken her to Sanemöser.

The old boy wanted to go to bed late,
Went to the cellar,
Drank with his boy a couple of rounds.
Arthur then locked the door,
And the boy stood all night outside.
They thought about it long,
And even woke up Rita Löffler.

The moral of the story?
Don’t hide yourselves from Athur.

* * *

<b>Prowin Pizza</b>

Last night the bathing-mater’s son came home,
Was hungry and shoved a pizza in the oven.
He turned on the oven and wondered,
What a strange foil seemed inside.
Takes it out and puts it in.
In 10 minutes the pizza fro Prowin is ready.

The next morning Mom gets a shock,
Who’s done this silling thing?
The oven cleaner from Prowin
Was still in the oven.
He hadn’t noticed it,
For he’d been high on alcohol,
And eaten the whole pizza.

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Health Region Freiburg: Feel Your Own Health (Satis Shroff)
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Die „HealthRegion Freiburg“ präsentiert sich erstmals auf der „fit for life.“ Die von führenden Einrichtungen aus Gesundheitswirtschaft und Tourismus gemeinsam getragene Initiative „HealthRegion Freiburg“ wird auf der „fit for life“, die im Rahmen der cft auf der Messe Freiburg stattfindet, vom 09. bis 10. März erstmals die Kompetenzen der Gesundheitsregion Freiburg einem breiten Publikum präsentieren. Dem interessierten Besucher bietet der Gemeinschaftsstand die Möglichkeit, sich aus erster Hand über die zahlreichen Angebote und Dienstleistungen der Partner zu informieren. Ergänzt wird das Informationsangebot durch kos-tenlose Gesundheits- und Vorsorgechecks, Demonstrationen und interessante Beiträge im begleitenden Vortragsprogramm. 

Auf dem 150 m² großen Gemeinschaftsstand, werden neben dem zentralen Infostand der „HealthRegion“ mit dem Universi-tätsklinikum Freiburg, dem Universitäts-Herzzentrum Freiburg-Bad Krozingen, dem RKK Klinikum, dem Zentrum für Ganzheit-liche Medizin Dres. Karner, dem Gesundheitsresort Freiburg, der Theresienklinik Bad Krozingen, dem Labordienstleister MVZ Clotten sowie dem PACs Verlag aus Staufen auch renommierte Einzelaussteller vertreten sein. Das Angebotsspektrum reicht von der erfolgreichen Therapie mit integrierten Angeboten über Rehabilitation bis hin zu Präventionsprogrammen für Privatper-sonen und Unternehmen. „Die Premiere dient interessierten Besucherinnen und Besuchern aus Deutschland, Frankreich und der Schweiz als regionales Schaufenster. Hier können sie sich aus erster Hand über individuelle Angebote zur Erhaltung und Wiederherstellung der persönlichen Lebensqualität und Leistungsfähigkeit informieren“, erläutert Bernd Dallmann, Vor-sitzender des Vereins HealthRegion Freiburg e.V. 

Thematisch im Vordergrund stehen die Themen Herz-Kreislauferkrankungen, Arthrose und Osteoporose, Minimal-Invasive Neurochirurgie, Ganzheitliche Medizin, Rücken-gesundheit, Medical Fitness, Betriebliches Gesundheitsma-nagement, Medical Wellness & Beauty sowie orthopädische und kardiologische Rehabilitation. 
Von den angebotenen Aktionen findet sich inhaltlich vieles in den begleitenden Vorträgen wieder: Von Bewegungstherapien zu Themen wie „Schmerzfrei: Natürlich!“ und „Rückenschmerzen ganzheitlich behandeln“ über den Check der Gleichge-wichtsfähigkeit am Posturomed bis zu Medical Wellness-Aktionen und Untersuchungsangeboten. Die Vorträge reichen von „Erfolgreiche Therapie bei Arthrose“ und „Behandlung von Wirbelsäulenerkrankungen: Neue Entwicklungen in der minimal invasiven Wirbelsäulenchirurgie“ über „Die Bauchspeicheldrüse – das vergessene Organ“ bis zu „Aktiv und gesund trotz Zucker-krankheit – Optimale Behandlung des Diabetes mellitus“ und „Den Arzt in der Westentasche -Diagnose und Therapie via Handy und Internet“. 

Der Verein HealthRegion Freiburg e.V. begleitet und ergänzt die Aktivitäten der für drei Jahre aus Mitteln des Europäischen Fonds für Regionale Entwicklung (EFRE) geförderten Cluster-initiative „Healthcare & Economy – Region of Competence Freiburg“. Ziel ist es, die Innovationsstärke und die Wettbewerbsfähigkeit der Region Freiburg in den Bereichen Gesundheitswirtschaft und Tourismus nachhaltig stärken und die landesweit geförderte Clusterinitiative HealthRegion F

Invasive Neurochirurgie, Ganzheitliche Medizin, Rücken-gesundheit, Medical Fitness, Betriebliches Gesundheitsma-nagement, Medical Wellness & Beauty sowie orthopädische und kardiologische Rehabilitation. 

Von den angebotenen Aktionen findet sich inhaltlich vieles in den begleitenden Vorträgen wieder: Von Bewegungstherapien zu Themen wie „Schmerzfrei: Natürlich!“ und „Rückenschmer-zen ganzheitlich behandeln“ über den Check der Gleichge-wichtsfähigkeit am Posturomed bis zu Medical Wellness-Aktionen und Untersuchungsangeboten. Die Vorträge reichen von „Erfolgreiche Therapie bei Arthrose“ und „Behandlung von Wirbelsäulenerkrankungen: Neue Entwicklungen in der minimal invasiven Wirbelsäulenchirurgie“ über „Die Bauchspeicheldrüse – das vergessene Organ“ bis zu „Aktiv und gesund trotz Zucker-krankheit – Optimale Behandlung des Diabetes mellitus“ und „Den Arzt in der Westentasche -Diagnose und Therapie via Handy und Internet“.

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Review: Love, Money, Home & Chinese Philosophy (Satis Shroff)

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Genre: Memoir

Sophie Boswell: The Power of Feng Shui Living Proof. Strategic Book Publishing, NY, 2008,  230 pages, Hardback $ 25,95

 

The purpose of this book is to give readers evidence of how the ancient Chinese philosophy works as the author herself is the ‘living proof.’ She’d applied it in her home-setting, relationships and business successfully. It’s a book about change and how to make it happen with you remaining in command. This knowledge is packed in the form of an enchanting love-story after two wrecked marriages, and a third endearing one, full of bliss and passion, thanks to Feng Shui.

 

Feng Shui? An Asian martial art? No, Feng Shui means ‘wind’ and ‘water’ and is the science of life in harmony with your direct environment. Feng Shui belongs to daily life in China. Wind and water belong to the taoistic knowledge that change is the fundamental principle of the universe. And we humans (and other species) as a part of this universe participate in a dynamic principle and are subject to eternal change. Feng Shui also gives you the opportunity to understand your fellow human being. Which theme belongs to this person? What does he or she have to know or discover? According to Feng Shui, your environ, working place, even your visiting-card reflects your personality. This is more than non-verbal communication. Sofia Boswell uses these ancient Chinese philosophical principles in modern western society and lifestyle with amazing success.

 

Your inner life begins to influence your outer world in a cheerful, positive way, whereby there’s a reciprocal exchange between the inner and the outer world.

 

Sophie’s story is topical and begins in Sydney in 1996, she travels through blue Hawaii, Newport Beach, New York and ends in Dubai in 2003. A perfectionist at heart, she doesn’t believe in failure despite setbacks in her business and in her private life. She regards a mistake as a chance to find another way to do and to go about things by using a change in perspective. There’s no room for headlong collisions in life. The gentle power of Feng Shui if often behind her decisions because she has internalised this philosophy.

 

Sophie’s grandfather was a successful businessman, and she has inherited his business acumen in her genes. Her grandmother, Kathleen Boswell, was a talented portrait painter and musicians, so the grandchild has an artistic streak and plays the piano and even writes lyrics today.

 

She reveals that the first ten years of her life ‘produced a strong minded individual’ which makes us understand that she didn’t seem to fit in with her peers. She was brought up as a proper English girl with all its connotations. There was ‘pomp and ceremony’ inside her house in far-away Australia but the family didn’t have much money to go with the aristocratic mannerisms. Brisbane wasn’t exactly the Cotswolds and was ‘dry and dusty with poisonous spiders and snakes; flies and mosquitoes came in plagues along with crickets and locusts.’

 

In addition to demonstrating that Feng Shui works, the narrative is humorous and true.

 

‘What are the author’s thought?’ you might ask. She does some fast thinking when an annoying man named Prem tells her, after consulting his tatty tarot cards: ‘Your life won’t begin until you’re sixty.’ He says further in his Indian English, ‘Vot you should do it is, is to let go!’ To detach oneself from things that bog us down. He tells her in no uncertain terms that she’ll change her lifestyle, travel and meet people she never dreamed of. All under a new flag.

 

But why would she want to change anything?

 

Sophia doesn’t seek psychics. ‘I never sought them out,’ she says. They seem to hook up with her whenever she needed help in life. In 1982 she met a psychic named Margaret Dent, after her first divorce. She had been living in a small rented two-bedroom house with her three little girls. Her husband had been a controlling man. It was a financial fiasco for her. Magaret predicted, ‘I see you sitting in a big house, in lush garden surrounding, near the harbour.’ And it came true. After 1984 she became rich through the use of her own resources in her home-based business and by putting all her energy into it. That one hour with Margaret Dent in Sydney had changed her life. The significance of this story is that women can get along in a men’s world through the understanding of Feng Shui, and is useful for female managers who have to assert themselves in so-called men’s business domains.

 

It was Elyse, a girl-friend of hers, a spiritual soul with a great knowledge about people and why they did things called her. She advised her to ring Rupert White, a person who could unblock trapped energy and show her which way to go in life. Mr. White was a Feng Shui expert, and the story of change begins here.

 

The component part of the book contributes to the purpose of the book for Sophie is an open-minded person and she seeks advice from psychics and clairvoyants when her normal logical, western thinking fails to help her in life problems. This is the beginning chapter, which is followed by an introduction to Feng Shui, Grounding, Letting Go, Closure, Hawaii’s  Magnetism, Destiny, An Unbelievable Answer, Taking the Plunge, Popping the Question, Popping the Cork, A Blessing from Heaven, Metamorphosis and Living Beyond the Dream. There are also some poems: The Angels Must Have Sent Him (dedicated to her beloved Zayid), Earthly Angels and seven Hawaiian landscape paintings done by the author. Another poem ‘I’m Watching Over You’ was written, according to Sophie, after Zayid died on December 9, 2009. He communicated via a medium and mutual friend, who then took it down and emailed it to her.

 

A comparison of the work to others within the same genre: Whereas Sophia Boswell already has three daughters and two divorces behind her, and has mastered her life, environment and business successfully, Elizabeth Gilbert, the author of ‘Eat, Pray, Love’ (published in 2006) is in her thirties, settled in a large house with a husband who wants to start a family. However, she doesn’t want any of it. After a bitter divorce and a rebound fling she emerges badly bruised. She goes on a quest to find out what’s missing in her life across Italy, India and Indonesia. I Rome she enjoys the Italian cuisine and handsome Giovanni, her Tandem Exchange Partner, almost Latin-lover, and puts on weight after all that pasta. In India she finds enlightenment, in an ashram frequented by westerners like her, through scrubbing temple floors. Liz even learns to chant the entire 182 Sanskrit verses of the Gurugita, the great, purifying basic hymn of the Hindus. She professes having felt happiness: better, truly than anything which included salty, buttery kisses and even saltier and more buttery potatoes. After that she’s glad to have made the decision to stay alone.

 

Unlike, Sophie, Elizabeth finds a toothless medicine man who reveals a new path to peace. She’s ready for love again. Filipe, a Brazilian-born man of Australian citizenship, says he needs towards the end of the story, he needs Bali because of his biz, its proximity to Australia where his kids live. Much like Sayid and Sofie, Liz and Felipe are also survivors of divorce. Felipe needs to be in Brazil often, because that’s where the gemstones are for his biz, and he has his family also there. The quest is over and Elizabeth returns to her family and friends in the USA. Can they build a life together divided between America, Australia, Brazil and Bali? Liz says, ‘Hey—why not?’

 

In Sophie’s story Zayid, her tall, handsome, Bedouin Arab brings her to life because she’d been in a mental rut. Zayid had humour and for Sophie he was the most interesting man she’d ever met and she had nothing to lose and dreamt of Lawrence of Arabia’s world with her Arabian hero. As a woman in love she notices every nuance. Zayid smells of Verace’s ‘Blue Jeans’ cologne. When he visits her in Hawaii she says, ‘Stars fell on Honolulu this night.’ He, on his part, kept on saying, ‘Life is short,’ which was perhaps a premonition of things to come. Another of his favourite expression is. ‘It takes two hands to clap,’ and he thanks her for inviting him to Hawaii. To Sophie, he’s her soul mate, a wild yet gentle man, and she even seems to know that ‘We were man and wife in another lifetime.’

 

Whereas Elizabeth Gilbert describes a major catastrophe in the form of a tsunami of staggering destruction in Southeast Asia, in Sophie’s Boswell’s ‘Power of Feng Shui’ she’s in a plane with fire-men from other states who were coming out to help out in the aftermath of 9/11 and the captain gives these brave men a bird’s eye view. Sophie describes thus: ‘In the distance we saw smoke still soaring skyward, highlighted by searchlights. The digging continues non-stop. The Captain asked us all to sing Amazing Grace as he headed for GuardiaAirport.’

 

Sophie’s poem ‘September 11’ still lingers in my mind.

 

On page 225 were the words she’d scribbled for me: To be continued..

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(The author in Berlin’s War Memorials..)

 

SVETLANA GEIER: The Woman Who Understood Dostoyevsky (Satis Shroff)

 

Svetlana Michailowna Iwanowa was born in 1923 in Kiew. She came to Germany in 1943 with her mother and was awarded an Alexander von Humbolt scholarship. She did German studies and Comparative Language Sciences at the University of Freiburg.

 

Svetlana married a violinist Christmut Geier and gave birth to two children. She did her first literary translation in 1953, a tale written by Leonid Andrejew. She gave lectures at the Albert Ludwig University of Freiburg to acquire a regular income and gained a reputation as the legendary translator of all the great works of Fydor Dostoyevsky.

 

The Russian writer liked reading all of Walter Scott and even recommended the father of a girl on August 18, 1880 to allow his daughter to read all of Dickens without any exception. Dostoyevsky also recommended that the girl should read Pushkin, Gogol, Turgenev and Goncharov.

 

Back to Svetlana Geier, the octogenarian lady who lived in Freiburg, and who internalised the great works of Dostoyevsky and who had a special way with the language so that the essence of what was written by the great Russian writer was not lost in translation from Russian into German. She had the ability to delve into Dostoyevsky’s innermost thoughts and question the relationship between the means and end in matters pertaining to the writer’s works and Russia in those days where freedom was a crucial issue.

 

‘Who am I?’ is the central urge of all the characters in the writings of Dostoyevsky. Much like the great Russian writer’s protagonists, we have to ask ourselves: who was this woman, how was her life and her works? For people who are interested in knowing more about Svetlana Geier, there’s a 94-minute German-Swiss documentary DVD written and directed by Vadim Jendreyko released in 2004. You can read Dostoyevsky (hardback) in German translation by Svetlana Geier published by Amman Verlag (Zürich). The paperback version has been published by S.Fischer Verlag (Frankfurt am Main).

 

Svetlana was an active mediator between Russian and German literature, and she translated Dostoyevsky’s five big novels big novels which she fondly called ‘the five elephants’, which were the milestones in her literary career.

 

Among the most famous works of Fyodor Dostoyevsky Crime and Punishment has a stellar position and the author was a contemporary of Charles Dickens. Crime and Punishment was first published in 1866 in a periodical named Russkii Vestnik. Other titles are: Notes from the Underground, The Idiot, The Devils and The Brothers Karamazov. In Crime and Punishment

an ex-student Raskolinikov  lives in poverty and chaos and eventually kills an elderly woman, a pawnbroker, and her sister. He believes that he has devised the perfect crime. A wonderful psychological novel about Raskolnikov’s psyche. Dostoyevsky shows how a person is formed by his mind and his thoughts.

 

For Svetlana Geier, her world became Dostoyevsky and she started translating his works at the age of 65. She was fascinated by the fast rhythm of Crime and Punishment and the author’s message to the reader. An act of aggression can be swift but life trudges on gradually. According to Svetlana, the correct German translation of Crime and Punishment should have been ‘Verbrechen und Strafe’ and not Schuld und Sühne. The English translation of the title is thus appropriate because the Russian words ‘presluplenije’ and ‘nakasanije’ mean exactly the same as in the English title.

 

A language has to be spoken and is not confined to a piece of paper, according to Svetlana in a Spiegel-interview carried out by Claudia Voigt. That’s why she always dictated her translations, because all thoughts have their origin in the recesses of the mind. In Creative Writing, we also say: read your poems and texts aloud. When you hear the spoken word you know whether there’s rhythm, style and beauty in the text you’ve brought to paper or recorder.

 

Dostoyevsky had used the word ‘suddenly’ (Russian: wdrug) very often in his Russian texts. The word suddenly suggests a turn of event, something’s happening and this is an action and device which moves the story forward.

 

The translation work of Svetlana Geier shows a great sensitive knowledge of language and her respect for the author is immense and she took pains to capture and translate the right spirit of the author’s work and the quintessence of author. She was also conscious of the fact that every translation remains an attempt to reach the absolute, which in turn is slippery as mercury. In this context, I think about Michael Hutt’s translation of Nepalese literature, as well as my experience with two other German translators in Freiburg. When you’re translating you can’t get into the psyche of the writer, what moved him or her at that moment in time and life. We can’t experience the circumstances the writers lived in. We can only imagine it and the question is: is your imagination precise? Dostoyevsky for instance possessed little money and often had no candles for work at night and sat hungry. And yet what he wrote was world literature about his country, politics, economy, characters and their innermost thoughts. Time also influences the choice of words that an author uses and even the language changes with the passage of time.

 

‘When you translate, you have to keep your nose high,’ was her teacher’s admonition to her when Svetlana was at school. You don’t translate from left to right, like the flow of the language, but the way you’ve read the sentence. It has to reach your heart. When she reads a  Dostoyevsky  text a day comes when she hears the melody of the text. To translate the works of the Russian literary giant, she studied his manuscripts and travelled to the original places described in the novels in order to understand the Geography and learn to see through the eyes of the author. Goethe also held the same view and said if you want to understand a poet’s verse, you have to visit his country. She was a painstaking translator of words, sentences, books, even searching for what lay beyond the written words.

 

Although she lived in Green City Freiburg and had seven grandchildren and 10 great-grand children, cooked for them and loved them, she had what we call a Russian soul (russische Seele) and the legendary Russian spirit. Her life was overshadowed by Europe’s fickle history and her fate was extraordinary. She worked as a translator during the occupation of Ukraine, and in 1943 she and her mother were interned in a work-camp in Dortmund (Germany). Later she studied, raised a family and began to translate Russian literature into German. She lectured for 40 years in different universities. Svetlana passed away last year.

 

 

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Christmas Concert in Kappel on December 26,2010

The Weihnachtskonzert was staged this time by the MGV Kappel and conducted by Johannes Söllner, and the Musikverein Freiburg-Kappel conducted by Manfred Preiß. The two vereins play host in alternating years. The concert began at 8pm in the Kappeler Festhalle. We did a last rehearsal in the media-room of the Schauinsland school in Kappel. Christel barged into the room and exclaimed, in a tearful voice, ‘The guests have started pouring in and there’s no one to greet them and take care of the tickets.’ That worked like a signal and we started to descend the stairs towards the Festhalle.

 

There were concert-guests taking off their thick winter overcoats, and helping their ladies out of their fur coats. The members of the musikverein were guests  gathered in the foyer. There was no chaos. Everything was under control.

The concert began with the Project Orchestra of the Musikverein conducted by Rainer Heuberger. They played popular instrumentals such as: Amazing Grace, the Pink Panther, My Romance, a Christmas medley, the Little Town of Bethlehem and Hawk. Most of the musicians were young boy barely in their teens, which is a good thing since there is a dearth of German youth in the singing and music choirs.

 

This time, we the Kappeler men’s choir, began with ‘Il est ne,le divin enfant´, a French song, followed by a beautiful yodel-song from Tyrole (Austria): ‘Andachtsjodler.’ The next song was the popular ‘Fröhliche Weihnacht überall’ which was originally a song from England.

 

Someone had absent-mindedly locked up the piano and the pianist started looking for the keys in his pockets and elsewhere. All the while under the scrutiny of a silent, tolerant audience. Perhaps they thought this was a gag, but it wasn’t. Finally Werner Walter asked the conductor who’d played the piano whether he had the keys. And voila! He had ’em in his raised left hand.

 

In such a constellation you have to have a few gospel and spiritual songs, and accordingly ‘Oh, Happy Day’ with Christoph Fuss as the lead singer, and ‘My Lord, What a Morning’ was sung to the delight of the audience.

A song that conjoured up images of South Africa was ‘Aya Ngena’ sung in Swaheli by the Männergesangverein, and promises of peace in the Middle East with ‘Hora Jerusalem.’ The Hebrew accents that we’d learned all these weeks and the fast tempi of the song got the audience raving.

 

The Musikverein Freiburg-Kappel came up with a project-orchestra conducted by Rainer Heuberger for this special occasion. The repertoire had ‘Gaillarde’ Pierre d’ Attaignant’ with arrangements by Manu Mellaerts, ‘And the Mountains Echoed: Gloria’ by Robert Longfield. Then came ‘Der Zigeunerbaron’ composed by Johann Strauss and arranged by Akira Yodo. Another song is from the musical ‘Elizabeth’ composed by Michael Kunze and Sylvester Levay with arrangements by Johan de Meij, followed by ‘Czardas’ by Vittorio Monti and arranged by Jan Rypens. The solist was Felix Klein. The musical arrangements were rather long but there was variety in the pieces, so it wasn’t that bad.

 

The moderators were Klaus Suetterle for the MGV Kappel and Karin Peter, who had an East-Bloc accent, for the Musikverein Kappel. After the concert it was a comfortable get-together and Miteinander in the Festhalle and the bar downstairs. The day after the Festhalle was cleared of everything that resembled a concert hall. We did it with German thoroughness: pico bello. 

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