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MGV ‘Liederkranz’ Kappel: What’s up in July 2014?

Image                     THAT WAS YESTERDAY..

                                     Image

                                            AND THIS IS THE MGV-KAPPEL TODAY…                  

11. Juli 2014: Eingemeindungsjubiläum um 18 Uhr in der Mehrzweckhalle-Kappel. In Sängeruniform antreten.

Literatur: Lesung um 20 Uhr in der Gemeindeheim-Kappel.

Veranstalter: KKV-Kappel.

Moderator: Ernst Ehemann.

Autoren: Hildegard Schaufelberger, Satis Shroff und Herr Reichert.

 

26. Juli 2014: MGV Projektchor Konzert um 20 Uhr in der Kapplerhalle. mgv-kImageappel.de

 

 

MGV ‘Liederkranz’ Kappel: What’s up in June 2014?(Image

 

Men’s choir concert, Freiburg-Kappel, last Summer. It was great fun to sing all those German hits, English Pop etc. This kid’s Dad was also singing. Welcome to Kappel on the 26th of July 2014 to our Project Concert 2014. 

Herzlichen Glückwunsch an Geburtstagskinder Walter Fuß und Franz Wießler.

1. Sa. 31. Mai 2014: Edgar Huber wurde 85 und wir haben gesungen bei Ihm zu Hause. Danach sind wir zu einem kleinen Fest eingeladen worden. Edgar hat gestrahlt.

 

  1. 2.Juni 2014: Endgültigen Programm ablauf von Kappler Juliläum am 30.Juli 2014 in der Sitzungssaal des Rathauses.

 

  1. 3.Juni 2014: Gemeindeheimgespräch wegen der MGV-Fahne um 20 Uhr. Erste Gesprächstermin hat schon am 28. Mai 2014 stattgefunden. Ergebnis noch ungewiß. Im Eingangsbereich möglicherweise.

 

  1. 7.Juni 2014: Jahreshauptversammlung von Sportverein Kappel ist verschoben auf 27.6.2014.

  2. 19. Juni 2014: Fronleichnam Prozession von kathol. Pfarrgemeinde um 8:30 Uhr.

 

  1. 21 Juni 2014: Einladung zum Richtfest der Stollenhütte Kappel um 14 Uhr.

                           Herr Ruf Meinrad, 75, feierte sein Geburtstag. Gratulation.

 

  1. 23. Juni 2014: 85. Geburtstag von Hans Ganter. Herzlich eingeladen, gesungen, danach Imbiss mit Getränke. Schöne Gartenambiente.

 

  1. 28. Juni 2014: Probetag von 10-14 Uhr. Danach Wanderung in Richtung Pfeifferberg. Kaffe und Kuchen. Bitte wer kann soll Kuchen backen und mitbringen.

20:00 Uhr Generalversammlung von Sportverein Kappel. Ort: Sportheim Kappel.

 

  1. 29.Juni 2014: Patrozinium um 9:30 Pfarrgemeindehaus.

 

  1. 30 Juni 2014: MGV-Vorstandssitzung um 19:30 bei Linders

 

 

Savvy New Project Choir Songs?

 

Geboren um zu leben (Rock Ballade:Heinrich Graf)

Wenn ich mal alt bin (When I’m sixty-four) Lennon/McCartney, German text: Westerhagen

Zieh einen Korken raus (Stimmungslied: Anton Gus)

Que sera,sera (Wiegender Walzer: Jay Livingston, Ray Edwards)

An Tagen wie diesen (Die Toten Hosen)

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Geistliche Konzert: From Evening Rise to Hine Ma Tov (Satis Shroff)

Man soll alle Tage wenigstens

Ein kleines Lied hören,

Ein gutes Gedicht lesen,

Ein treffliches Gemälde sehen und,

Wenn es möglich zu machen wäre,

Einige vernünftige Worte sprechen.

(Johann Wolfgang von Goethe)

 

It was a lovely evening in Kappel’s graveyard on one of those green benches and looking at the three big trees where a lot of birds were twittering and chirping, coming home to roost. You could discern the water sprout of a nearby fountain with the water splashing incessantly. Tits and finches were flying about on the tree tops. I heard heavy steps and saw the anticipated faces of the members of our men’s choir.

I greeted them with ‘Grüß Gott die Herren!’ and was greeted by smiling faces, all wearing the choir uniform, ties studded with myriads of lyras, white shirts, black shoes and trousers and cobalt blue blazers. Reminded my of the Brit school I went to in my schooldays in the foothills of the Himalayas.

This time we had another motto: geistliche Musik aus aller Welt, that is, spiritual music from all over the world. This time our guests were Intermezzo Ihringen, yes Ihringen, the sunniest place in Germany and excellent wines.

We sang ‘Evening Rise,’ which is a Native American song, in German together with or guests from Intermezzo Ihringen, which is a mixed choir. The audience was advised not to applaud after every song but at the end.

The joy and fascination of singing comes like a sea-wave when you sing in a choir, and takes you away. We sing songs from different parts of the world, and every language has language brings its own rules, regulations and pecularities. Russian words as in ‘Tabie pajom’ are pronounced in a gutteral manner, with a lot of ‘sch’ thrown in, and the Israeli song ‘Hora Jerusalem’ with a lot of volume, whereas the song from Botswana ‘Sana Sananina’ demands a tip of the tongue, hissing intonation.

Thomas Carlyle put it aptly when he said: Music is appropriately termed as the language of the angels. In this context ‘Näher mein Gott, zu Dir’ and ‘Heil dir, heilige Himmelskönigin’ give you a prelude to what Heaven, paradise, Swarga can be like.

Music is the common language of human beings, said Henry Wadsworth Longfellow. As we grow older, the physical state of the body becomes involved in a breakdown but our souls remain young. The soul becomes wiser through all the life experiences. What the elderly singer doesn’t have, in terms of spontaneous and dynamic explosive actions of the youth and strength, is compensated by the experience of the elderly. He’s been-there-and done-it already. The young and the elderly in a choir become a common strength. Singing brings joy and happiness to us. We receive what we give to the audience in terms of applause and recognition, for the songs evoke emotions.

We from the MGV-Kappel sang a song composed by L. Mason and arranged by our common conductor Johannes Söllner: ‘Näher mein Gott’, which I knew as ‘Nearer to Thee’ from my school days, which was sung during a retreat in the woods where we were obliged to write resolution on pieces of paper and then burn them in the end. Our second song was ‘Tebje payom’ by D. Bortnyansky.

This was followed by a Mongolian song sung by Mrs. Schneider who hails from Ulan bator.

Intermezzo Ihringen sang ‘Weit Weg’ by H. von Goisern, followed by G. Sutherland’s ‘Sailing,’ made famous by  Rod Stewart.

Since Christian Kohler couldn’t make it, the orgel-improvisation was done by Robert Klöckner, a lanky, bespectacled guy, who plays the orgel in neighbouring Ebnet and studies Music as a Freshman.

We then sang two songs: ‘Sancta Maria,’ a slow song with feeling, followed by ‘Heil dir, Heil’ge Himmelskönigin’, an spiritual from England.

Another Mongolian song came thereafter, which evoked images of the vast Stepplands because the singer shouted in her songs. It was delightful to hear her and her headgear and golden costume reminded me of Tibetan festive clothes. The Mongolians are Buddhists too, despite the long years of Soviet rule.

Intermezzo Ihringen then brought groove to the evening and  sang ‘Swing Low’, a spiritual followed by ‘Didn’t my Lord Deliver Daniel’, a gospel song.

Robert Klöckner played his orgel-improvisations for the second time.

After that we sang ‘Hine ma tov,’ a popular song from Israel, followed by ‘Good News’, a gospel song with the theme ‘chariots are coming’ and threatening to destroy a folk that is on the run. Then came ‘Hora Jerusalem,’ another well-known song from Israel. The applause was thunderous.

The encore song was, as usual, the German version of ‘The Rivers of Babylon.’

After the concert, we all went over to the Gemeindehaus, a wooden house built in the Schwarzwald-style, where we drank beer, wine, ate brezeln and other German dishes like sausages and steaks, as is the custom, and talked animatedly late into the night.

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Geistliche Konzert: From Evening Rise to Hine Ma Tov (Satis Shroff)

 

Man soll alle Tage wenigstens

Ein kleines Lied hören,

Ein gutes Gedicht lesen,

Ein treffliches Gemälde sehen und,

Wenn es möglich zu machen wäre,

Einige vernünftige Worte sprechen.

(Johann Wolfgang von Goethe)

 

It was a lovely evening in Kappel’s graveyard on one of those green benches and looking at the three big trees where a lot of birds were twittering and chirping, coming home to roost. You could discern the water sprout of a nearby fountain with the water splashing incessantly. Tits and finches were flying about on the tree tops. I heard heavy steps and saw the anticipated faces of the members of our men’s choir.

 

I greeted them with ‘Grüß Gott die Herren!’ and was greeted by smiling faces, all wearing the choir uniform, ties studded with myriads of lyras, white shirts, black shoes and trousers and cobalt blue blazers. Reminded my of the Brit school I went to in my schooldays in the foothills of the Himalayas.

 

This time we had another motto: geistliche Musik aus aller Welt, that is, spiritual music from all over the world. This time our guests were Intermezzo Ihringen, yes Ihringen, the sunniest place in Germany and excellent wines.

 

We sang ‘Evening Rise,’ which is a Native American song, in German together with or guests from Intermezzo Ihringen, which is a mixed choir. The audience was advised not to applaud after every song but at the end.

 

The joy and fascination of singing comes like a sea-wave when you sing in a choir, and takes you away. We sing songs from different parts of the world, and every language has language brings its own rules, regulations and pecularities. Russian words as in ‘Tabie pajom’ are pronounced in a gutteral manner, with a lot of ‘sch’ thrown in, and the Israeli song ‘Hora Jerusalem’ with a lot of volume, whereas the song from Botswana ‘Sana Sananina’ demands a tip of the tongue, hissing intonation.

 

Thomas Carlyle put it aptly when he said: Music is appropriately termed as the language of the angels. In this context ‘Näher mein Gott, zu Dir’ and ‘Heil dir, heilige Himmelskönigin’ give you a prelude to what Heaven, paradise, Swarga can be like.

 

Music is the common language of human beings, said Henry Wadsworth Longfellow. As we grow older, the physical state of the body becomes involved in a breakdown but our souls remain young. The soul becomes wiser through all the life experiences. What the elderly singer doesn’t have, in terms of spontaneous and dynamic explosive actions of the youth and strength, is compensated by the experience of the elderly. He’s been-there-and done-it already. The young and the elderly in a choir become a common strength. Singing brings joy and happiness to us. We receive what we give to the audience in terms of applause and recognition, for the songs evoke emotions.

 

We from the MGV-Kappel sang a song composed by L. Mason and arranged by our common conductor Johannes Söllner: ‘Näher mein Gott’, which I knew as ‘Nearer to Thee’ from my school days, which was sung during a retreat in the woods where we were obliged to write resolution on pieces of paper and then burn them in the end. Our second song was ‘Tebje payom’ by D. Bortnyansky.

 

This was followed by a Mongolian song sung by Mrs. Schneider who hails from Ulan bator.

 

Intermezzo Ihringen sang ‘Weit Weg’ by H. von Goisern, followed by G. Sutherland’s ‘Sailing,’ made famous by  Rod Stewart.

 

Since Christian Kohler couldn’t make it, the orgel-improvisation was done by Robert Klöckner, a lanky, bespectacled guy, who plays the orgel in neighbouring Ebnet and studies Music as a Freshman.

 

We then sang two songs: ‘Sancta Maria,’ a slow song with feeling, followed by ‘Heil dir, Heil’ge Himmelskönigin’, an spiritual from England.

 

Another Mongolian song came thereafter, which evoked images of the vast Stepplands because the singer shouted in her songs. It was delightful to hear her and her headgear and golden costume reminded me of Tibetan festive clothes. The Mongolians are Buddhists too, despite the long years of Soviet rule.

 

Intermezzo Ihringen then brought groove to the evening and  sang ‘Swing Low’, a spiritual followed by ‘Didn’t my Lord Deliver Daniel’, a gospel song.

 

Robert Klöckner played his orgel-improvisations for the second time.

 

After that we sang ‘Hine ma tov,’ a popular song from Israel, followed by ‘Good News’, a gospel song with the theme ‘chariots are coming’ and threatening to destroy a folk that is on the run. Then came ‘Hora Jerusalem,’ another well-known song from Israel. The applause was thunderous.

 

The encore song was, as usual, the German version of ‘The Rivers of Babylon.’

 

After the concert, we all went over to the Gemeindehaus, a wooden house built in the Schwarzwald-style, where we drank beer, wine, ate brezeln and other German dishes like sausages and steaks, as is the custom, and talked animatedly late into the night.

 

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Christmas Concert in Kappel on December 26,2010

The Weihnachtskonzert was staged this time by the MGV Kappel and conducted by Johannes Söllner, and the Musikverein Freiburg-Kappel conducted by Manfred Preiß. The two vereins play host in alternating years. The concert began at 8pm in the Kappeler Festhalle. We did a last rehearsal in the media-room of the Schauinsland school in Kappel. Christel barged into the room and exclaimed, in a tearful voice, ‘The guests have started pouring in and there’s no one to greet them and take care of the tickets.’ That worked like a signal and we started to descend the stairs towards the Festhalle.

 

There were concert-guests taking off their thick winter overcoats, and helping their ladies out of their fur coats. The members of the musikverein were guests  gathered in the foyer. There was no chaos. Everything was under control.

The concert began with the Project Orchestra of the Musikverein conducted by Rainer Heuberger. They played popular instrumentals such as: Amazing Grace, the Pink Panther, My Romance, a Christmas medley, the Little Town of Bethlehem and Hawk. Most of the musicians were young boy barely in their teens, which is a good thing since there is a dearth of German youth in the singing and music choirs.

 

This time, we the Kappeler men’s choir, began with ‘Il est ne,le divin enfant´, a French song, followed by a beautiful yodel-song from Tyrole (Austria): ‘Andachtsjodler.’ The next song was the popular ‘Fröhliche Weihnacht überall’ which was originally a song from England.

 

Someone had absent-mindedly locked up the piano and the pianist started looking for the keys in his pockets and elsewhere. All the while under the scrutiny of a silent, tolerant audience. Perhaps they thought this was a gag, but it wasn’t. Finally Werner Walter asked the conductor who’d played the piano whether he had the keys. And voila! He had ’em in his raised left hand.

 

In such a constellation you have to have a few gospel and spiritual songs, and accordingly ‘Oh, Happy Day’ with Christoph Fuss as the lead singer, and ‘My Lord, What a Morning’ was sung to the delight of the audience.

A song that conjoured up images of South Africa was ‘Aya Ngena’ sung in Swaheli by the Männergesangverein, and promises of peace in the Middle East with ‘Hora Jerusalem.’ The Hebrew accents that we’d learned all these weeks and the fast tempi of the song got the audience raving.

 

The Musikverein Freiburg-Kappel came up with a project-orchestra conducted by Rainer Heuberger for this special occasion. The repertoire had ‘Gaillarde’ Pierre d’ Attaignant’ with arrangements by Manu Mellaerts, ‘And the Mountains Echoed: Gloria’ by Robert Longfield. Then came ‘Der Zigeunerbaron’ composed by Johann Strauss and arranged by Akira Yodo. Another song is from the musical ‘Elizabeth’ composed by Michael Kunze and Sylvester Levay with arrangements by Johan de Meij, followed by ‘Czardas’ by Vittorio Monti and arranged by Jan Rypens. The solist was Felix Klein. The musical arrangements were rather long but there was variety in the pieces, so it wasn’t that bad.

 

The moderators were Klaus Suetterle for the MGV Kappel and Karin Peter, who had an East-Bloc accent, for the Musikverein Kappel. After the concert it was a comfortable get-together and Miteinander in the Festhalle and the bar downstairs. The day after the Festhalle was cleared of everything that resembled a concert hall. We did it with German thoroughness: pico bello. 

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