Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Archive for July, 2008

<!– @page { size: 21cm 29.7cm; margin: 2cm } P { margin-bottom: 0.21cm } –>

Oh, Kanchenjunga (Satis Shroff)

A splash of the crimson rays of the sun appeared on the tip of the 8598m Kanchenjunga Range. Then it turned into orange and was gradually bathed in a yellowish tint, becoming extremely bright. You could discern the chirping of the Himalayan birds in the surrounding bushes and trees, amidst the clicking of cameras. I was on Tiger Hill. But my thoughts were elsewhere.

I was thinking about Kanchenjunga, my Hausberg as we are wont to call it in Germany, and the former memories of my school-days in the foothills of the Himalayas. These mountains had moulded and shaped me to overcome odds, like other thousands of other Gorkhalis, Nepalese, Lepchas, Bhutanese, Tibetans and Indians, from both sides of the Himalayas. I have watched the Kanchenjunga ever since I was a child in its different moods and seasonal changes. Cloud-watching over the Kanchenjunga was always a fascinating pastime whether from Ilam, Sikkim or Darjeeling´s Tiger Hill or even Sandakphu. To the Sikkimese the Kanchenjunga has always been a sacred mountain, and on its feet are precious stones, salt, holy sciptures, healing plants and cereals. It is a thousand year belief and tradition that the Himalayas, the abode of the Gods, should not be sullied by the feet of mortals.

Oh Kanchenjunga, you have taught us Gorkhalis and Nepalis to keep a stiff upper-lip in the face of adversity created by humans in this world and to light a candle, rather than to curse the darkness. To adapt, share and assimilate, rather than go under when the going gets tough in foreign shores. The Himalayas have taught us to be resilient and to bear pain without complaining, to search for solutions and to keep our ideals high, and not to forget our rich culture, tradition and religious beliefs.

After a brisk drive through pine-forested areas and blue mountains, I was rewarded by a vision of the Kanchenjunga Massif in all its majesty. At Ghoom, which is the highest point along the Hill Cart road, we went to the 19th century Buddhist monastery, about 8km from Darjeeling. In the massive, pompous pagoda-like building with a yellow rooftop, was a shrine of the Maitree Buddha, with butter lamps and Buddhist scarves in gaudy scarlet, white and gold.

It was a feast for the eyes. Tibetan art in exile. You go through the rooms of the museum which has precious Buddhist literature, traditional Himalayan ritual masks and a numismatic collection in the centre of the room, with coins and currency from Tibet that were in circulation till 1959. A small friendly lama-apprentice posed for a photograph of the tourists. And another little Buddha,with jet-black hair, suddenly came up, behind a mask of a Tibetan demon with ferocious-looking teeth, and sprang in front of us to get photographed for posterity.

A blue coloured Darjeeling Himalayan train built in 1881 by Sharp, Steward & Co, Glasgow, chugged along on its way to Kurseong (Khar-sang), another hill station along the route from Darjeeling to Siliguri in the plains of India. There were young Gorkhali boys from Ghoom, having a jolly time, jumping in and out of the running toy-train, with the conductor shouting at them and doing likewise, and trying to nab one of them. But the Ghoom boys were far better and faster than the ageing, panting train-conductor, whose tongue almost hanged out of his red face. It was a jolly tamasha indeed. A spectacle for the passengers amidst the breath-taking scenery in tea-country.

I thought about my friend Harka, who used to live in Ghoom, and who was one of those boys during my school-days. The last I heard of him was when he and his dear wife invited yours truly and a student friend named Tekendra Karki, now a physician in Katmandu, to have excellent Ilam tea with Soaltee Oberoi sandwiches. Tek and I were doing our BSc then at Tri Chandra college in Katmandu.

Along the side of the mini railway track, reminiscent of the Schwabian Eisenbahn from Biberach , were groups of vendors of Tibetan origin selling used clothes, trinkets, belts, bags and most other accessoirs that you find being sold along the Laden La road, leading to Chowrasta in Darjeeling.

A short drive to the Batasia loop, where the blue train made a couple of loops during its descent to Darjeeling, and suddenly you saw the clouds above the silvery massif, rising languidly in the morning.

The families of the British officers used to retreat to the hills of Darjeeling, Simla, Naini Tal to escape from the scorching heat of the India summer, and carried out their social lives and sport under the shadow of the Himalayas. Cricket, polo, pony-riding,soccer. You can still go to the Gymkhana and do roller-skating, try out a Planter’s Punch and, of course, a First Flush or dust Darjeeling tea to suit your pocket. The Chogyal of Sikkim gave the hill-station Darjeeling to the British as a gesture of Friendship, for the Sikkimese fought with the British troops against the Nepalese in the Anglo-Nepalese War (1814-15). The British government thanked the Chogyal of Sikkim and rewarded him with a handsome annual British pension. Didn’t he become a vassal of Great Britian after this act?

I went with my burly Gorkha school-friend Susil to Dow Hill via Kurseong, past the Tuberculosis sanatorium, in a World War II vintage jeep driven by a Gorkha named Norden Lama, who had blood-shot eyes and a whiff of raksi. There´s no promillen control (alcohol-on-wheels) in Darjeeling, and in the cold winter and rainy monsoon months it isn´t unusual to find jeep and truck-drivers stopping to take a swig of raksi, one for the road, to keep themselves warm. I must admit, I felt relieved when we reached our destination in one piece.

Driving along the left track of the autobahn at 150 km per hour is safe compared to all the curves that one has to negotiate along the Darjeeling trail on misty days. We were rewarded with excellent ethnic Rai-cuisine comprising dal-bhat-shikar cooked with coriander, cumin, salt, chillies, garlic, ginger and love. My school friend who´s a Chettri, a high caste Hindu, known for the ritual purity and pollution thinking, had married a Rai lady, much to the chagrin of his parents, but unlike Amber Gurung´s sad song “Ma amber huh, timi dharti,” they were extremely happy and had come together after the principle: where there´s a will, there´s a way. Or “miya bibi raaji, to kya kareyga kaji.”

As is the custom among Gorkhalis, we ritually washed our hands, sat down cross-legged, put a little food symbolically for the Gods and Goddesses, and relished our meal without talking. Talking during meals is bad manners in the Land of the Gorkhas, Nepal and the diaspora where the Gorkhalis and Nepalese live.Gorkhaland is a dream of people who cam from Nepal through migration to the British tea gardens, roads and toy-train workshops in Tindharia, and since the roads have gained importance after the British left and in the aftermath of the Indo-Chinese conflict in 1962, there was a need for the roads to be repaired by the Indian government and what better workers to hire in the foothills of the Himalayas than the sturdy, willing helpers of Nepalese origin who have lived in the area since generations.

Just as the government of Nepal under King Mahendra and Birendra carried out resettlement programms for the hill people who were eternally foraging for work in the plains (Terai) and India, the Bengal government did the same through its bureaucratic rules of transferring the Nepalese of Darjeeling district who had worked in the Darjeeling Himalayan Railway to the plains at Katihar and other places. It was a difficult transfer for the Gorkhalis, and they not only had to battle with the beastly and scorching sun of the the Indian plains but also had to learn to communicate in Hindi, Bihari, Bengali and English with the arrogant Bengalis.

On the other hand, the Bengali babus started coming in teeming numbers to the hills of Darjeeling fleeing from the plains of Calcutta, and delighted at the prospects of living in the hills of Darjeeling, Kurseong and Kalimpong with perks and enjoying the fresh air and Nature, especially Kanchanjunga. The mountain took a new meaning for the Bengalis and Satyajit Ray was inspired to produce and direct a film with the title: Kanchenjunga. It became „Amar Konchonjonga” for the Bengalis.

And thereby hangs a tale.

Ode to Kanchenjunga from a Old Boy

Satis

I felt really “chuffed” when I saw your text on Radheshyam Sharma’s Blog, ” My School_ I wish “, asking after me. Yes I’m alive and kicking and have been settled in Perth since December 1972. Never too late to learn so this Bajay is grateful for the 77 years I’ve reached and blessed with good health and a close loving family and I’m still learning !

I am an ardent fan of your honest and ethical literary work and feel proud that I may have played a small part in it when I had to drum Nesfield’s Grammar et al into unreceptive heads. I pride myself in proclaiming that I have spent more than forty years in the place of my birth, Darjeeling and I have not been shaken in my love for the place and people in spite of the transformation I have seen on my visits. Your writing reenforces this and no one can take our Kunchenjunga from us.

You have done …Omnia Bene Facere

Matt Lobo

Read Full Post »

<!– @page { size: 21cm 29.7cm; margin: 2cm } P { margin-bottom: 0.21cm } –>

Oh, Kanchenjunga (Satis Shroff)

A splash of the crimson rays of the sun appeared on the tip of the 8598m Kanchenjunga Range. Then it turned into orange and was gradually bathed in a yellowish tint, becoming extremely bright. You could discern the chirping of the Himalayan birds in the surrounding bushes and trees, amidst the clicking of cameras. I was on Tiger Hill. But my thoughts were elsewhere.

I was thinking about Kanchenjunga, my Hausberg as we are wont to call it in Germany, and the former memories of my school-days in the foothills of the Himalayas. These mountains had moulded and shaped me to overcome odds, like other thousands of other Gorkhalis, Nepalese, Lepchas, Bhutanese, Tibetans and Indians, from both sides of the Himalayas. I have watched the Kanchenjunga ever since I was a child in its different moods and seasonal changes. Cloud-watching over the Kanchenjunga was always a fascinating pastime whether from Ilam, Sikkim or Darjeeling´s Tiger Hill or even Sandakphu. To the Sikkimese the Kanchenjunga has always been a sacred mountain, and on its feet are precious stones, salt, holy sciptures, healing plants and cereals. It is a thousand year belief and tradition that the Himalayas, the abode of the Gods, should not be sullied by the feet of mortals.

Oh Kanchenjunga, you have taught us Gorkhalis and Nepalis to keep a stiff upper-lip in the face of adversity created by humans in this world and to light a candle, rather than to curse the darkness. To adapt, share and assimilate, rather than go under when the going gets tough in foreign shores. The Himalayas have taught us to be resilient and to bear pain without complaining, to search for solutions and to keep our ideals high, and not to forget our rich culture, tradition and religious beliefs.

After a brisk drive through pine-forested areas and blue mountains, I was rewarded by a vision of the Kanchenjunga Massif in all its majesty. At Ghoom, which is the highest point along the Hill Cart road, we went to the 19th century Buddhist monastery, about 8km from Darjeeling. In the massive, pompous pagoda-like building with a yellow rooftop, was a shrine of the Maitree Buddha, with butter lamps and Buddhist scarves in gaudy scarlet, white and gold.

It´s was a feast for the eyes. Tibetan art in exile. You go through the rooms of the museum which has precious Buddhist literature, traditional Himalayan ritual masks and a numismatic collection in the centre of the room, with coins and currency from Tibet that were in circulation till 1959. A small friendly lama-apprentice posed for a photograph of the tourists. And another little Buddha,with jet-black hair, suddenly came up, behind a mask of a Tibetan demon with ferocious-looking teeth, and sprang in front of us to get photographed for posterity.

A blue coloured Darjeeling Himalayan train built in 1881 by Sharp, Steward & Co, Glasgow, chugged along on its way to Kurseong (Khar-sang), another hill station along the route from Darjeeling to Siliguri in the plains of India. There were young Gorkhali boys from Ghoom, having a jolly time, jumping in and out of the running toy-train, with the conductor shouting at them and doing likewise, and trying to nab one of them. But the Ghoom boys were far better and faster than the ageing, panting train-conductor, whose tongue almost hanged out of his red face. It was a jolly tamasha indeed. A spectacle for the passengers amidst the breath-taking scenery in tea-country.

I thought about my friend Harka, who used to live in Ghoom, and who was one of those boys during my school-days. The last I heard of him was when he and his dear wife invited yours truly and a student friend named Tekendra Karki, now a physician in Katmandu, to have excellent Ilam tea with Soaltee Oberoi sandwiches. Tek and I were doing our BSc then at Tri Chandra college in Katmandu.

Along the side of the mini railway track, reminiscent of the Schwabian Eisenbahn from Biberach , were groups of vendors of Tibetan origin selling used clothes, trinkets, belts, bags and most other accessoirs that you find being sold along the Laden La road, leading to Chowrasta in Darjeeling.

A short drive to the Batasia loop, where the blue train made a couple of loops during its descent to Darjeeling, and suddenly you saw the clouds above the silvery massif, rising languidly in the morning.

The families of the British officers used to retreat to the hills of Darjeeling, Simla, Naini Tal to escape from the scorching heat of the India summer, and carried out their social lives and sport under the shadow of the Himalayas. Cricket, polo, pony-riding,soccer. You can still go to the Gymkhana and do roller-skating, try out a Planter’s Punch and, of course, a First Flush or dust Darjeeling tea to suit your pocket. The Chogyal of Sikkim gave the hill-station Darjeeling to the British as a gesture of Friendship, for the Sikkimese fought with the British troops against the Nepalese in the Anglo-Nepalese Wat (1814-15). The British government thanked the Chogyal of Sikkim and rewarded him with a handsome annual British pension.Didn’t he become a vassal of Great Britian after this act?

I went with my burly Gorkha school-friend to Dow Hill via Kurseong, past the Tuberculosis sanatorium, in a World War II vintage jeep driven by a Gorkha named Norden Lama, who had blood-shot eyes and a whiff of raksi. There´s no promillen control (alcohol-on-wheels) in Darjeeling, and in the cold winter and rainy monsoon months it isn´t unusual to find jeep and truck-drivers stopping to take a swig of raksi, one for the road, to keep themselves warm. I must admit, I felt relieved when we reached our destination in one piece.

Driving along the left track of the autobahn at 150 km per hour is safe compared to all the curves that one has to negotiate along the Darjeeling trail on misty days. We were rewarded with excellent ethnic Rai-cuisine comprising dal-bhat-shikar cooked with coriander, cumin, salt, chillies, garlic, ginger and love. My school friend who´s a Chettri, a high caste Hindu, known for the ritual purity and pollution thinking, had married a Rai lady, much to the chagrin of his parents, but unlike Amber Gurung´s sad song “Ma amber huh, timi dharti,” they were extremely happy and had come together after the principle: where there´s a will, there´s a way. Or “miya bibi raaji, to kya kareyga kaji.”

As is the custom among Gorkhalis, we ritually washed our hands, sat down cross-legged, put a little food symbolically for the Gods and Goddesses, and relished our meal without talking. Talking during meals is bad manners in the Land of the Gorkhas, Nepal and the diaspora where the Gorkhalis and Nepalese live.Gorkhaland is a dream of people who cam from Nepal through migration to the British tea gardens, roads and toy-train workshops in Tindharia, and since the roads have gained importance after the British left and in the aftermath of the Indo-Chinese conflict in 1962, there was a need for the roads to be repaired by the Indian government and what better workers to hire in the foothills of the Himalayas than the sturdy, willing helpers of Nepalese origin who have lived in the area since generations.

Just as the government of Nepal under King Mahendra and Birendra carried out resettlement programms for the hill people who were eternally foraging for work in the plains (Terai) and India, the Bengal government did the same through its bureaucratic rules of transferring the Nepalese of Darjeeling district who had worked in the Darjeeling Himalayan Railway to the plains at Katihar and other places. It was a difficult transfer for the Gorkhalis, and they not only had to battle with the beastly and scorching sun of the the Indian plains but also had to learn to communicate in Hindi, Bihari, Bengali and English with the arrogant Bengalis. On the other hand, the Bengali babus started coming in teeming numbers to the hills of Darjeeling fleeing from the plains of Calcutta, and delighted at the prospects of living in the hills of Darjeeling, Kurseong and Kalimpong with perks and enjoying the fresh air and Nature, especially Kanchanjunga. The mountain took a new meaning for the Bengalis and Satyajit Ray was inspired to produce and direct a film with the title Kanchenjunga. It became „Amar Kanchanjunga” for the Bengalis.And thereby hangs a tale.

Read Full Post »

<!– @page { size: 21cm 29.7cm; margin: 2cm } P { margin-bottom: 0.21cm } –>

Applied Ethnotherapy 2008 (Satis Shroff)

Blurb:Satis Shroff introduces you to the world of Ethnomedical therapies that are used by Practitioners of Traditional Medicine, and the seminar to go with these therapies in Munich, Germany. The Ethnomed therapy sessions are a regular affair organised by the Universities of Heidelberg and Munich.Traditional Medicine should go hand in hand with Modern Medicine. The Health Insurance organisations and medical school authorities have yet to recognize this form of alternative, traditional medicine,which is based on Nature and so-called supernatural phenomenons.


Die Ethnomedizin wird auch in diesem Jahr wieder in München ein Forum haben. Dass die Ethnomedizin/Ethnotherapien in Heilungs- und Gesundheitsprozesse von Menschen verstärkt in die sogenannten klassischen Behandlungsmethoden integriert werden und Eingang finden müssen wissen wir längst.

Die Chancen, die sich für das gesamte Gesundheitssystem ergeben können, wenn die seelische, psychische und auch spirituellen Ebenen von Menschen im Heilungs- und Gesundheitsprozess integriert werden sind unübersehbar.

Trotzdem haben die ethnotherapeutischen Methoden, Behandlungsformen und Rituale nicht den Stellenwert, der ihnen und ihrer Bedeutung entsprechen würde. It would be necessary to work towards this end and to make the concerned authorities change their attitude towards this end.


Dass der Schwerpunkt in diesem Jahr auf den angewandten Ethnotherapien liegt, ist sehr spannend und bietet wieder einmal die Chance, die Potentiale der Ethnotherapien zu erkennen. Ich wünsche allen Teilnehmerinnen und Teilnehmer der Fortbildung Ethnotherapien viel Spaß und viele gute und interessante Begegnungen, Erkenntnisse und Erlebnisse und den OrganisatorInnen viel Erfolg für das Seminar.
Lydia Dietrich
Stadträtin München

Rabia Schirrmann und Pragya Sabine Erlei (Körpertherapeutinnen, Tibetan Pulsing Yoga, D.) vermitteln das Tibetan Pulsing Yoga, eine Bewusstseins- und Heilarbeit, die Körper, Emotionen und Gedanken miteinander in Einklang bringt. Diese Methode hat ihre Wurzeln in den tantrischen Klöstern Tibets als auch in den taoistischen Klöstern Chinas.

INTENSIV-PRAXIS-SEMINAR 9.-12. OKTOBER 2008
FORTBILDUNG  ETHNOTHERAPIEN
Wissen – Erkennen – Heilen
in der Universität München und im Eibenwald Paterzell
9.-12. Oktober 2008 Times
ETHNOMED Institut für Ethnomedizin e.V.

ETHNOTHERAPIEN – HEILVERFAHREN DIESER WELT
Seit Jahrtausenden sind das Verstehen der Sprache der Natur und die Kommunikation mit der „anderen Welt“ das Geheimnis alten Heilwissens. Lassen Sie uns in drei Tagen die Grenzen des „normalen“ Erlebens überschreiten und neue Dimensionen heilerischen Schaffens ergründen.


Erleben Sie in dieser praxisnahen Fortbildung intensiv das Wirken von Heilern aus Peru, Mexiko, Kasachstan und unserer eigenen Kultur. Wir laden Sie ein, die vorgestellten Methoden selbst zu beobachten, zu erfragen und zu üben. Diese reichen von handfesten chiropraktischen  Anwendungen der Mochica, einer Prä-Inka-Kultur, über archaische Heilrituale bis hin zum Aufspüren der spirituellen Wurzeln einer jeden Krankheit.


Mitten im Naturschutzgebiet des Paterzeller Eibenwaldes erfahren Sie das Orakeln und „Raunen“ der Runen, hören das Wispern der Pflanzengeister und erforschen die Botschaften aus Ihren eigenen inneren Tiefen. T


Die Eibe war in der germanischen und keltischen Kultur ein heiliger und mächtiger Baum, im alten Ägypten wurde sie mit dem Jenseits verbunden und war ein Begleiter ins Totenreich. In der modernen Medizin erhofft man sich, aus der Eibe Wirkstoffe für die Krebstherapie zu gewinnen. Die Eibe erneuert sich immer wieder selbst. Daher steht sie im Volksglauben für ewiges Leben, für Tod und Wiedergeburt. Für Magier, Druiden, Ärzte früherer Zeiten, Seher und Heiler war sie Helfer und Begleiter.

PROGRAMM

DONNERSTAG 9.10.2008
19.00 Uhr bis ca.21.00 Uhr
Abendvorträge der Referenten und Heiler in der Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München, Pettenkoferstr. 11

FREITAG 10.10.2008 BIS SONNTAG 12.10.2008
GenevaIntensiv-Praxis-Fortbildung im Paterzeller Eibenwald
Ende: Sonntag ca. 17.30 Uhr

INTENSIV-PRAXIS-FORTBILDUNG 2008Times
Referenten (alphabetisch)

Maria-Elisabeth, Medium, Deutschland
Jede Krankheit basiert auf Ursachen, die im Feinstofflichen zu suchen sind oder spirituelle Auslöser haben. Fast alle Heiltraditionen ursprünglicher Völker kennen Trancezustände um Krankheitsursachen zu kennen. Der Heiler oder Schamane stellt dabei eine besondere  Verbindung zum Kranken her und kann damit intuitiv den Auslöser oder  den Anlass der Erkrankung finden und Impulse zur Heilung geben. Noch einen Schritt weiter geht der schamanische Röntgenblick. Dabei geht das Medium in einem veränderten Bewusstseinszustand mit einem speziell geschulten Blick durch alle Ebenen des Körpers und sieht
dabei den Zustand der Organe und Körperregionen. Es zeigt sich dabei auch die ganz konkrete physische Beschaffenheit. Eine feinere Wahrnehmung ist bereits bei vielen Menschen vorhanden und kann geschult und geübt werden. In der Fortbildung führt Maria-Elisabeth in das Thema und ihre Arbeitsweise ein. Persönliche Fragen sind  möglich. Ziel der Übungen ist die Erweiterung der Wahrnehmungsfähigkeit und die Hinführung an die medialen Fähigkeiten Teilnehmer. Einzigartig ist dabei die praktische Selbsterfahrung
als auch die hellsichtige mediale Begleitung bei den Übungen.


Spirituelle Wahrheiten werden hier lebendig und können direkt selbst  erfahren und im Gespräch nachvollzogen werden. Maria-Elisabeth  praktiziert ihre Arbeit als Medium seit vielen Jahren, erläutert und  demonstriert ihre Techniken in der praktischen Anwendung und bringt dabei die Teilnehmer an die eigenen intuitiven heilerischen Fähigkeiten.


Hardy Hoffmann, Runen- und Meditationsexperte, Deutschland
Die Druiden wirkten in früheren Zeiten mit den Heilströmen der Runen, durch die sie zu innerer Kraft kamen, Reinigungen vornahmen oder auf Krankheiten einwirkten, mental und physisch. Runen sind universelle Kraftsymbole der Nordmeervölker. In unserer Heimat wurden Runen seit uralten Zeiten eingesetzt, um das Wissen um die Kräfte der Natur zu erlangen und sie leicht im Alltag zu nutzen. Mit Abschluss in der Transzendentalen Meditation T.M. und Studienreisen nach Indien, SO-Asien und Australien spezialisierte sich Hardy Hoffmann auf die Techniken der Natur-Religionen der alten Nordmeervölker Europas. Er ist heute führende Größe im Bereich der Runen-Magie und vermittelt ihre Fertigkeit in Verbindung mit Schulung der Intuition und dem Erkennen der Vorsehung. Mit diesen Fertigkeiten üben wir das Aufspüren von Energiefeldern, das Aufnehmen von energetischen Strömen und die praktische Anwendung der Erdkraftfelder. So werden Sie in diesen Tagen Ihre persönliche Rune finden und die Kräfte der Natur und ihrer Wesenheiten in und um sich spüren, sowie viel Wissenswertes über die Kräfte der Natur entdecken. Dieses uralte Wissen soll hier zu neuem Leben erweckt werden.


Kokopelli, Traditioneller Tänzer der Azteken & Anthropologe
, Mexiko
Jorge A. Kokopelli Guadarrama, Sohn von Nopaltzin, wurde früh von seiner Familie getrennt um die aztekischen Traditionen zu lernen. An der National School of Anthropology and History studierte er
Anthropologie. Aus persönlicher Überzeugung setzt er sich dafür ein, die Wurzeln seiner Kultur zu vermitteln, damit die Welt einen Teil dieser wunderbaren Tradition kennen lernt. Die Azteken, auch Mexicas genannt, waren eines der bedeutendsten Völker im präkolumbianischen Mexiko. Kokopelli zeigt in diesen Tagen die bis heute lebendigen Rituale seines Volkes. Es werden Mythologien weitergegeben über das indigene, spirituelle Erbe der Azteken sowie Visionen des Volkes über die Zukunft in unserer modernen Welt.
Rituale zur Reinigung des Energiekörpers oder der Aurareinigung nehmen einen besonderen Stellenwert ein. Mit aztekischen Rhythmen und dem Klang der Medizintrommel werden Reisen in andere Bewusstseinszustände unternommen, um den Energiekörper zu reinigen und die täglichen Blockaden zu lösen. Mit einem speziellen Ritual –Gebet zur Erde –  ruft man nach aztekischer Vorstellung Energie aus
dem Kosmos, die Krankheiten heilt, Gebete oder Danksagungen übermittelt oder Antworten auf wichtige Fragen gibt. Es ist ein lebendiges Gebet an die Erde, uns zur universellen Größe des Seins zu  erheben. Eigene Trommeln können mitgebracht werden.

Laura Pacheco, Heilerin, Peru
Laura Pacheco hatte in jungen Jahren einen schlimmen Verkehrsunfall mit Knochenbrüchen, Lähmungserscheinungen und Nervenausfällen. Verletzungen im Gehirn bedrohten ihr Leben, die Schulmedizin war machtlos. Nach langer Suche fand sie einen erfahrenen alten Heiler der Mochica, einer prä-inka-Kultur Perus. Er behandelte sie, und Laura Pacheca genas in kurzer Zeit vollkommen und konnte Sport und Studium wieder aufnehmen. Sie bat den Heiler inständig, ihr dieses Wissen zu vermitteln, doch er weigerte sich zunächst, die alte und bisher geheime Tradition seiner Vorfahren weiterzugeben. Schließlich
gab er Lauras drängenden Bitten nach, und es folgten viele Jahre des intensiven Lernens und Praktizierens. Der Lehrer sprach nicht über sein Wissen, er schulte Laura durch Fühlen, Beobachten und Anwenden.  Ihr Meister starb 2006 und hinterließ nur Laura sein einzigartiges Erbe. Laura Pacheco nimmt die große Verantwortung zur Heilung der Menschen in der Welt wahr und möchte diese alte, sehr effektive Heilmethode gerne an engagierte und interessierte Menschen weitergeben.


Saira Serikbajewa, Heilerin, Kasachstan und  Maria Gavrilenko
, Professorin für Sprachen, Kasachstan
Saira Serikbajewa steht seit früher Kindheit mit der traditionellen Medizin ihres Volkes in Verbindung und arbeitet seit 20 Jahren als Schamanin. Die Kasachen sind von je her ein Volk der Nomaden, das seit Urzeiten eine Vielfalt von Heilverfahren aus der Natur entwickelt hat und durch die medizinische Erfahrung anderer Völker Zentralasiens, Chinas, Indiens und des arabischen Orients ergänzte. Die Therapie, die Saira und Maria demonstrieren werden, ist die Wachstherapie. Diese Therapie kann jeder anwenden, verstehen können sie jedoch nur die “Feuer-, Wasser-, Luft- und Erdmagier”,diejenigen, denen sich durch ihr langjähriges Praktizieren die Sprache  der Natur offenbart hat. Der Therapie liegen die Eigenschaften des Bienenwachses zugrunde. Durch diese Therapie kann man Menschen, Tieren, Pflanzen und sogar Autos oder Häusern helfen. indem man bei der Behandlung  die Kraft des Feuers und des Wassers anspricht und in die Therapie mit  einbezieht. Jegliches Problem kann gelöst, Betrug aus Licht gebracht werden, Magie, Hexerei und böser Blick verlieren ihre Macht. kann eingeleitet werden., Hilfe vermittelt, das Leben zu meistern, den Weg zu öffnen, frei zu machen,  manchmal sogar auch das Leben retten. Die Wachstherapie kann niemandem schaden, sie kann nur helfen. Die Biene – die Mutter vom  Wachs, findet in der Blume nur den Nektar, die Spinne jedoch nur das Gift. Das ist die gute Eigenschaft der Biene – das Böse zu übergehen, das Gute vom Bösen trennen zu können, die Wahrheit von der Unwahrheit zu unterscheiden. Diese alte Heilweise, von uns tiefgründig studiert und  vervollkommnet, hilft uns, den Patienten zu reinigen und zu heilen: auf der physischen, emotionalen, mentalen und geistigen Ebene.


Dr. Wolf Dieter Storl, Ethnobotaniker, Schamanenforscher,
Deutschland
Die indigenen Wurzeln der europäischen Heilpflanzenkunde. Die indigenen Völker nördlich der Alpen, die  Germanen, Slawen und vor allem die Kelten, prägen Aspekte der Volksmedizin  bis zum heutigen Tag. Nicht nur wurde im ländlichen Raum das Wissen um die endemischen Kräuter – darunter auch die Archäophyten, die mit den ersten Bauern kamen – überliefert, sondern auch verschiedene Sammel-  aund  Ausgrabrituale, sowie Rituale der Zubereitung und der Einnahme. Träger dieser „kleinen“Tradition waren vor allem die Frauen. Dieses indigene Heilsystem war in einem archaischen Weltbild eingebettet, das sich erheblich von der kulturellen Matrix  der „großen“ Tradition der offiziellen Kloster-,  Apotheker- und  Ärztemedizin, unterschied. In diesem Seminar wollen wir etwas über diese Heilkunde erfahren, indem wir, während einer Exkursion in freier Natur, endemische Pflanzen im ethnomedizinischen Kontext vorstellen.

INTENSIV-PRAXIS-FORTBILDUNG 2008

Orte:
9.10.2008: Vortragsabend in der Universität München, Pettenkoferstr. 11
10.-12.10.08: Intensiv-Praxis-Fortbildung, Seminarhaus Eibenwald, nahe München (Anfahrtsbeschreibung und Unterkunftsmöglichkeiten werden mit der Anmeldebestätigung verschickt)
Zeiten:
Do. 9.10.08: 19-21 Uhr

Fr. 10.10.08: 9-19 Uhr
Sa. 11.10.08: 9-19 Uhr
So. 12.10.08: 9-17.30 Uhr

Hinweis: Traditionelle Heiler und Referenten anderer Kulturen denken oft nicht in unseren westlichen Strukturen. Wir bitten deshalb verständnisvoll und flexibel mit sich verändernden Programminhalten und Zeitplänen umzugehen. Unerwartetes und Überraschendes ist erfahrungsgemäß im Bereich der Ethnomedizin unausweichlich.

Anmeldung bitte schicken/faxen an  +49-89-40 90 81 29
ETHNOMED e.V. • Melusinenstr. 2 • D-81671 München

Read Full Post »